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Setting an example

 

Setting an example

With the huge rise of online bullying and with Anti Bullying week, on the theme of “Choose Respect”, commencing 12 November, we need to think about why so many children treat each other with little respect.

It is interesting to see the recently conducted survey by the Anti Bullying Alliance.  Their research talks about the worrying numbers of children (41% of 11-16 year olds) who had seen adults bullying each other in the past 6 months – 21% face-to-face, 18% online and 20% in the media.  Not only do children recognise that this sets a bad example, but the report shows 97% s would like to see more respect shown between adults.

I have been talking for quite some time about adults embracing positive behaviour and how, if we change this, it could reduce the number of children being bullied.  I am starting to believe that, if we started with the grownups, we really could make a difference.  I see frequent posts on social media speaking about people in a negative way.  I have seen posts calling people “selfish” for parking their car incorrectly; another calling a person an “idiot” for jumping in front of a train and causing mayhem with transport.  When our children are being bullied, parents post their frustration online, which I do understand, but this is contradicting the very advice we give children at school; telling them not to respond or retaliate to bullying.

Have we lost the ability to feel compassion and think about why people might act in certain ways?  Are we becoming a nation of opinionated campaigners who can’t tolerate an opposing viewpoint or debate an issue without throwing insults?  I do believe this strongly and I regularly talk about this subject in my workshops.  Adults are worse than children when it comes to posting online.  It is no wonder that children have little respect for each other when, in fact, they are just mirroring behaviour that they have learnt from the adults around them.

 

Preparing Children For a Life Online – British Schools of the Middle East

Preparing Children For a Life Online

Preparing Children For Online Life

For the Schools of the Middle East

4th October 2018

11am Bahrain Time

Gooseberry Planet is passionate about raising the profile of E-Safety in schools and about engaging and educating the whole school community.  Parents and teachers have a combined responsibility to protect and prepare children for a life online.  But are we doing enough?  Do we feel comfortable talking about online dangers? CAN we talk about them or does lack of knowledge, coupled with the digital divide between us and the younger generation, make this difficult?

During the workshop, we will explore all the current social media platforms and discuss the current threats and vulnerabilities that exist online for everyone.  You will challenge and reflect upon their own online behaviours and explore practical strategies that can be used immediately to keep themselves and others safer online. The delegates will also investigate Facebook, instagram, google, you tube etc.. privacy settings, Live gaming devices, Live video streaming and fake profiles. 

The session will highlight the importance of involving parents in the child’s learning journey and show how Gooseberry Planet can equip teachers with a complete toolkit to effectively and confidently address the subject of E-Safety.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Gooseberry Planet launches Prevent CPD

In partnership with a highly respected Prevent practitioner and subject matter expert, Gooseberry Planet has developed a comprehensive, accessible CPD that covers all aspects of the Prevent Duty that affect education. It is also the most up-to-date training available, incorporating the recently released CONTEST Strategy 2018 (which includes significant changes to Prevent) as well as the latest Home Office Channel referral figures which highlight the essential role that education plays in safeguarding young people through Prevent.

The CPD is divided into 7 sections, each one with a short assessment at the end to check understanding. Case studies involving different types of extremism (based on real-life Prevent referrals) are incorporated throughout the module to reinforce the learning and bring the CPD to life.

  • Introduction to the Prevent Duty
  • What is Prevent
  • Extremism
  • Responsibilities for schools
  • British Values
  • Vulnerabilities
  • Warning signs
  • Reporting

Gooseberry Planet would like your help

Gooseberry Planet would like your help

Gooseberry Planet would like your help

Please respond to the Age-Appropriate Design Code Consultation

In December, a little known, but hugely important piece of legislation was passed. A data protection code specifically for children and young people, the Age Appropriate Design Code, will change their experience of the digital world in a profound way. To make it robust we need your help.

Few people think about the importance of children’s data, but it is a big business. Data includes information from a child’s name, birthdate, address and friends. It can also infer their sexuality, race, personal preferences, shopping and entertainment habits. Hundreds of small details increasingly affect not only how they are seen by education institutions, commercial companies and future employers, but also guide the experiences they have online.

The Age-Appropriate Design Code will seek to minimise the amount of data, the kinds of data and the spread of their data that can be collected; and will support a child’s right to retract, to correct or to challenge data held about themselves. In doing so, it will reverse the overwhelming nature of data collection that also demands a child’s constant attention to, and interaction with, their devices.

The Information Commissioner is consulting with a wide range of people including parents, teachers, psychologists and academics on the Code. We are asking Gooseberry Planet supporters to submit to the Information Commissioner’s call for evidence. This may be something you have done before, but if you have not submitted before be brave and do so now! Remember, you don’t have to answer every question.

We support the Age-Appropriate Design Code because it addresses the needs of children and young people to grow up in an environment that respects their privacy.

We like the fact that it uses the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child – that means a child is anyone under the age of 18.

We recognise that children are different at different ages, and we support the idea that online services should consider children of different ages differently.

We want the following things to be mandatory in the Code:

High privacy by default, which would give children and young people greater control over who can access their personal information.

Routine failure by online services to uphold their own terms and conditions must be considered a breach of the Code and subject to enforcement, such as fines, commitment to changing their services for the benefit of children.

Geolocation must be off by default, so that children are not tracked or commercially exploited.

Data is only taken during active use of services and apps, to reverse the current trend of online services capturing every piece of a child’s data.

Child data impact assessments for all existing and new services to understand and minimise data privacy risks for children.

A universal reporting system which would allow all children confidently to contact online services when they experience problems or need assistance.

A commitment from the Government to enforce the Code. This will ensure robust and effective implementation of children’s rights online.

If you have any questions or need assistance in filling in the submission form, or if you have any thoughts or ideas, you can contact stella@gGooseberryplanet.com

You can find more information about the Age-Appropriate Design Code and children’s privacy in the Information Commission’s blog.

Thank you for your support

Stella James
Head Gooseberry